Tips for coping with anxiety from a Psychiatrist

#MILLENNIALLIFECRISIS

The frontal lobe is the part of the brain that is responsible for executive functions such as planning for the future, judgment, decision-making skills, attention span, and inhibition. It’s responsible your ‘normal’ mood.

For a regular person, the Amygdala (fight or flight) portion of the brain is switched on when one comes in contact with danger, or potential danger. The Amygdala takes over the frontal lobe to ensure you make/take steps to protect yourself. For example, when you’re walking a trail and you can see a bear in the path ahead of you – that is when the Amygdala comes into play.

For an anxious person, it can almost seem as though there is no clear line between what is perceived as safe and what is perceived as dangerous. Instead of their being a clear switch to turn on the Amygdala, it seems to consistently stay on. Almost like a…

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A Prayer – for those growing old

Lord, You know I am growing older. Keep me from becoming talkative and possessed with the idea that I must express myself on every subject.

Release me from the craving to straighten out everyone’s affairs.

Keep me from the recital of endless detail. Give me wings to get to the point.

Seal my lips when I am inclined to tell of my aches and pains. They are increasing with the years and my love to speak of them grows sweeter as time goes by.

Teach me the glorious lesson that occasionally I may be wrong. Make me thoughtful but not nosey; helpful but not bossy.  With my vast store of wisdom and experience it does seem a pity not to use it all. But You know, Lord, that I want a few friends at the end.

Amen.

Photo:  Blue Mountains. N.S.W.  (c) Marie Trudinger  2010.

Winter Sunset

This photo was taken on the first night I arrived in Switzerland in February. I didn’t have my tripod with me, so I had to take the photo, hand held. It is a panorama. I believe I took 3 photos and stitched them together. It was a beautiful sunset that just seemed to last forever. This view is just behind where I was staying and I had a nice little walk in the evening. It is amazing how different everything looks, covered in snow.

William Kling (my grandson)

Photo (c) William Kling, February 2019.

If I had my Life to live over

If I had my life to live over:

I would try to make more mistakes next time

I would relax

I would be sillier than I have been on this trip

I know very few things I would take seriously

I would be crazier

I would be less hygienic

I would take more chances

I would have more trips

I would climb more mountains

Swim more rivers

and watch more sunsets

I would eat more ice creams and less beans

I would have more actual troubles and fewer imaginary ones

You see, I am one of those people who lives prophylactically and sanely and sensibly

Hour after hour and day after day.

I have my moments, and if I had to do it over again

I would have more of them, in fact I’d try to have nothing else,

just moments, one after another,

instead of living so many years ahead each day.

I’ve been one of those people who never go anywhere without

a thermometer, hot water bottle, gargle, raincoat and parachute.

If I had to do it over again I’d go places and travel lighter, than I have.

If I had my life over, I would start barefooted in the Spring

and stay that way until Autumn.

I would play hooky more,

I wouldn’t make such good grades, except by accident.

I would ride more merry-go-rounds,  and I’d pick more daisies.

(Written by an 87 year old lady)

Photo by Eyup Belen on Pexels.com